Experiencing Winter in Ottawa

Rideau Canal Skateway
Ottawa Tourism
Ottawa Tourism

Come winter, some head indoors. Canadians go out — especially in Ottawa, Ontario. When you visit, you’ll see why: Ottawa is like a winter postcard come to life: lovely white snowscapes, strolling crowds bundled up in coats and scarves, lively outdoor festivals with enormous ice sculptures and al fresco ice bars, twinkle lights illuminating frosty trees, and skaters gliding along the Rideau Canal.

 

Winter in Canada’s capital city is delightful. It’s chilly, and that’s how the locals like it. In fact, they revel in winter. Join in the fun and while you’re at it, pause for a steaming hot chocolate and BeaverTail on the street, shop at the year-round, historic ByWard Market, and warm up at one of the latest trendy restaurants, coffee shops, or lounges.

Ice skate outside

Rideau Canal Skateway

Rideau Canal National Historic Site - credit: Ottawa Tourism

It’s quintessentially Canadian: skating the Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the world’s biggest naturally frozen rink, free and open January to March, conditions allowing. Rent skates and see if you can make the nearly five-mile distance from downtown to Dows Lake, stopping at a snack shack or heated  hut to recharge. If the canal’s not frozen, try the outdoor and lighted Ottawa City Hall Rink of Dreams (November to March). You can also snowshoe, cross-country ski, or winter hike around town.

 

Get into ice hockey

A year of special events

A photo posted by @ecossemorris on

Canada = hockey. Catch a casual pick-up game outside on the ice — or why not rent some skates and join the action? Join local fans to watch an Ottawa Senators or 67’s game. If you visit in 2017, Ottawa is celebrating a bunch of big anniversaries: the Senators’ 25th  season, the NHL’s 100th, and the 125th year of the Stanley Cup, which plays at its original home, Rideau Hall, March 16. In mid-March, Ottawa is rolling out a four-day hockey extravaganza. There’s a special exhibition at the Canadian Museum of History, NHL player showcase, concert, and unveiling of a new city monument on Sparks Street.

See art, and plenty of it

National Gallery of Canada

National Gallery of Canada - credit: Ottawa Tourism/National Capital Commission

You can spend all day or all week in the light-filled galleries of the country’s premier art showcase. Some 1,200 permanently displayed works of renowned artists in this architectural landmark tell the story of Canada’s heritage and culture. With a focus on Canadian and contemporary, collections of paintings, photographs, sculpture, and drawings include indigenous and international, plus high-profile visiting exhibitions — from centuries-old to the avant-garde. Out front, pause to take in the fabulous view of the Parliament buildings, festively illuminated during the holiday season.

Get cultured

TD Ottawa Winter Jazz Festival

Take in a concert at February’s popular jazz fest, with performances at six downtown venues. The four-day celebration — known for its bold programming, loyal fans, and enthusiastic audiences — spotlights emerging and established local artists and international headliners. Also in January and February are the Alterna Savings Crackup comedy festival and Ottawa Winter Brewfest, plus dozens of seasonal events and performances.

Celebrate the season in ice

Winterlude

Winterlude: A Capital celebration of winter – credit: Canadian Heritage

It’s tradition: The first three weekends of February mean Winterlude, a citywide annual celebration. Taking place day and night, this free event showcases all things wintry — outside, of course. There’s an international ice carving contest in downtown’s Confederation Park, concerts and dancing, skating lessons, outdoor hockey tournaments, outside playground with giant snow slides (grownups welcome, too), outdoor skating along the Rideau Canal, food and wine pairings and chef demos, even a race across the ice with decorated beds. Who says summer gets all the glory?

Take in the twinkle lights

Parliament Hill

Parliament Hill, Canada’s federal seat of government, is the heart of Ottawa. And during the Christmas holidays from early December through January, 400,000 lights illuminate the stately Gothic stone buildings overlooking the Ottawa River and nearby downtown. At the official lighting, carolers serenade gathered crowds. Stay for a new evening light and sound show projected onto the Parliament buildings every 15 minutes from 5:30 to 11:30 pm. Take a free guided tour any day (first come, first served), listen to a daily bell tower concert, or learn about the Hill’s many sculptures commemorating significant Canadian figures. If you like holiday cheer, the Hill is your place.

 

After your vacation in Ottawa, chances are winter will be your new favorite season.

See what else there is to do in winter at the Ottawa Tourism website.

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